Monday, 30 October 2017

Business Letter Writing 5.7

Business Letter Writing 5.7
Sales Letters: Four Point Action Closing
Securing Action
Having convinced your reader that your product or service is worth the price, you want to get action before the reader has a change of mind, before forgetfulness defeats you, before the money goes for something else—before any of the things that could happen do happen. Therefore, a good persuasive closing is essential.

A good action closing—or clincher—should include the following four points:

1. clearly state what action you wish the reader to take.
2. make that action easy through facilitating devices and careful wording.
3. date the action—if possible and appropriate.
4. provide a reader benefit as stimulus for action.

1) Clearly State What Action You Wish The Reader To Take
Should the reader order your product or service? Call your office to set up an appointment? Fill out a form? Visit a local dealership or store to see a demonstration? Invite the visit of a sales representative? On finishing your letter, your reader should know just exactly what you want done and how it should be done.

At times, you may have to name two actions and ask the reader to take one or the other. If you possibly can, avoid doing so. Some people faced with a choice resolve their dilemma by doing nothing.

2) Make That Action Easy Through Facilitating Devices And Careful Wording
Facilitating devices: order blanks, order cards, and postcards or envelopes already addressed and requiring no postage—remove some of the work in taking action. Also, your phone number (with area code and extension) are useful if you want the reader to call you. Finally, state your office hours and location if you want the reader to come to see you in person. References to these facilitating devices—preferably directing the reader to use them—reassure the reader that what you are asking is simple and requires little time and effort.

Careful wording: through careful wording, you can also emphasize that what you are asking the reader to do is simple. "Write and let us know your choice" suggests more work than "Check your color choice on the enclosed card." "Jot down," "just check," "simply initial" are also examples of wording that suggest ease and rapidity in doing something. Such wording helps reduce reader reluctance to take action.

3) Date The Action—If Possible And Appropriate
Name the date whenever you need the reader's response by a certain time. Tactfully tell the reader why you need it then—perhaps to meet the deadline for a sale.

4) Provide A Reader Benefit As Stimulus For Action
Always mention some benefit(s) the reader will gain by prompt action. Such a reminder of the desirability of your product or service—some- times called a clincher—comes appropriately at the ending of your letter. It not only provides motivation for the reader, but it also has decided psychological value as well because it emphasizes service attitude—rather than the greed stressed if you end with dollars and cents talk or the mechanics of ordering.

You should always include elements 1, 2, and 4 of the four point action closing when you are writing a letter relating to sales. You should use dated action, item 3, ONLY when it is appropriate for your writing situation.

Some examples of closing paragraphs follow. Determine whether or not they include all elements of the four point action closing needed for a tactful, yet persuasive letter ending.

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Business Letter Writing 5.6

Business Letter Writing 5.6
Business Letters: Accentuating the Positives
Your letters will be more successful if you focus on positive wording rather than negative, simply because most people respond more favorably to positive ideas than negative ones. Words that affect your reader positively are likely to produce the response you desire in letter-writing situations. A positive emphasis will persuade the reader and create goodwill. In contrast, negative words may generate resistance and other unfavorable reactions. You should therefore be careful to avoid words with negative connotations. These words either deny—for example, no, do not, refuse, and stop—or convey unhappy or unpleasant associations—for example, unfortunately, unable to, cannot, mistake, problem, error, damage, loss, and failure.

When you need to present negative information, soften its effects by superimposing a positive picture on a negative one.

Stress what something is rather than what it is not.
emphasize what the firm or product can and will do rather than what it cannot.
open with action rather than apology or explanation.
avoid words which convey unpleasant facts.

Compare the examples below. Which would be more likely to elicit positive reader response?

In addition, you should reemphasize the positive through embedded position and effective use of space.

Embedded Position:

Place good news in positions of high emphasis: at the beginnings and endings of paragraphs, letters, and even sentences.

Place bad news in secondary positions: in the center of paragraphs, letters, and, if possible, sentences.

Effective Use Of Space:

Give more space to good news and less to bad news.

Evaluate the examples below to determine whether or not they present negative information favorably.




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Sunday, 29 October 2017

Business Letter Writing 5.5

Business Letter Writing 5.5
Sample Letters
If you are using letterhead, do not include the sender's address at the top of the letter; instead, begin with the date.
(i) Block Format

(ii) Modified Block

 (iii) Semi-Block


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Business Letter Writing 5.4

Business Letter Writing 5.4
Business Letters' Format and Font
Block Format:
When writing business letters, you must pay special attention to the format and font used. The most common layout of a business letter is known as block format. Using this format, the entire letter is left justified and single spaced except for a double space between paragraphs.
Modified Block:
Another widely utilized format is known as modified block format. In this type, the body of the letter and the sender's and recipient's addresses are left justified and single-spaced. However, for the date and closing, tab to the center point and begin to type.
Semi-Block:The final, and least used, style is semi-block. It is much like the modified block style except that each paragraph is indented instead of left justified.

note: Keep in mind that different organizations have different format requirements for their professional communication. While the examples provided above contain common elements for the basic business letter (genre expectations), the format of your business letter may need to be flexible to reflect variables like letterheads and templates. These examples are merely guides.If your computer is equipped with Microsoft Office, the Letter Wizard can be used to take much of the guesswork out of formatting business letters. To access the Letter Wizard, click on the Tools menu and then choose Letter Wizard. The Wizard will present the three styles mentioned here and input the date, sender address and recipient address into the selected format. Letter Wizard should only be used if you have a basic understanding of how to write a business letter. Its templates are not applicable in every setting. 


Font:
Another important factor in the readability of a letter is the font. The generally accepted font is Times New Roman, size 12, although other fonts such as Arial may be used. When choosing a font, always consider your audience. If you are writing to a conservative company, you may want to use Times New Roman. However, if you are writing to a more liberal company, you have a little more freedom when choosing fonts.

Punctuation:
Punctuation after the salutation and closing - use a colon (:) after the salutation (never a comma) and a comma (,) after the closing. In some circumstances, you may also use a less common format, known as open punctuation. For this style, punctuation is excluded after the salutation and the closing.

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Business Letter Writing 5.3

Business Letter Writing 5.3
Parts of a Business Letter:
This resource is organized in the order in which you should write a business letter, starting with the sender's address if the letter is not written on letterhead.

Sender's Address:
The sender's address usually is included in letterhead. If you are not using letterhead, include the sender's address at the top of the letter one line above the date. Do not write the sender's name or title, as it is included in the letter's closing. Include only the street address, city, and zip code.

Date:
The date line is used to indicate the date the letter was written. However, if your letter is completed over a number of days, use the date it was finished in the date line. When writing to companies within the United States, use the American date format. (The United States-based convention for formatting a date places the month before the day. For example: June 11, 2001. ) Write out the month, day and year two inches from the top of the page. Depending which format you are using for your letter, either left justify the date or tab to the center point and type the date.

Inside Address:
The inside address is the recipient's address. It is always best to write to a specific individual at the firm to which you are writing. If you do not have the person's name, do some research by calling the company or speaking with employees from the company. Include a personal title such as Ms., Mrs., Mr., or Dr. Follow a woman's preference in being addressed as Miss, Mrs., or Ms. If you are unsure of a woman's preference in being addressed, use Ms. If there is a possibility that the person to whom you are writing is a Dr. or has some other title, use that title. Usually, people will not mind being addressed by a higher title than they actually possess. To write the address, use the U.S. Post Office Format. For international addresses, type the name of the country in all-capital letters on the last line. The inside address begins one line below the date. It should be left justified, no matter which format you are using.

Salutation:
Use the same name as the inside address, including the personal title. If you know the person and typically address them by their first name, it is acceptable to use only the first name in the salutation (for example: Dear Lucy:). In all other cases, however, use the personal title and last/family name followed by a colon. Leave one line blank after the salutation.
If you don't know a reader's gender, use a nonsexist salutation, such as their job title followed by the receiver's name. It is also acceptable to use the full name in a salutation if you cannot determine gender. For example, you might write Dear Chris Harmon: if you were unsure of Chris's gender.

Body:
For block and modified block formats, single space and left justify each paragraph within the body of the letter. Leave a blank line between each paragraph. When writing a business letter, be careful to remember that conciseness is very important. In the first paragraph, consider a friendly opening and then a statement of the main point. The next paragraph should begin justifying the importance of the main point. In the next few paragraphs, continue justification with background information and supporting details. The closing paragraph should restate the purpose of the letter and, in some cases, request some type of action.

Closing:
The closing begins at the same vertical point as your date and one line after the last body paragraph. Capitalize the first word only (for example: Thank you) and leave four lines between the closing and the sender's name for a signature. If a colon follows the salutation, a comma should follow the closing; otherwise, there is no punctuation after the closing.

Enclosures:
If you have enclosed any documents along with the letter, such as a resume, you indicate this simply by typing Enclosures one line below the closing. As an option, you may list the name of each document you are including in the envelope. For instance, if you have included many documents and need to ensure that the recipient is aware of each document, it may be a good idea to list the names.

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Sunday, 24 September 2017

Functional English WORK SHEET 5.2

Functional English WORK SHEET 5.2

(A)  Punctuate the following sentences:

a. God made women beautiful so that men may love them and men foolish so that they may return the favour
b. We had a great time in France  the kids really enjoyed it
c. His attitude to say the least was really horrible
d. Some people work best in the mornings others do better in the evenings
e. America england and france got together and went after germany
f. What are you doing next weekend
g. Milton the great Puritan poet went blind at the age of forty four.
h. Mother had to go into hospital she had heart problems
i. He told his wife Learn to live with my silence.
j. Did you understand why I was upset
k. It is a fine idea let us hope that it is going to work
l. We will be arriving on Monday morning  at least I think so
m. A textbook can be a wall between teacher and class
n. The girls father sat in a corner
o. In the words of Murphys Law Anything that can go wrong will go wrong

(B)   Find out basic punctuation errors:

a. The dots…. may also be called leaders.
b. Mind your ps and qs
c. There are no if’s and but’s in the face of enemy fire.
d. There are no buts in the sentence.
e. He married Sania, Anuj, Ahana.
f. To the weak by nature, all things are bad.
g. I met a beautiful, European woman.
h. Once I realized that I could no longer rely on him.
i. The accused said the judge is to be hanged.
j. My aunt who lives in Mumbai is a doctor.

(C)   Select the correctly punctuated sentence:
1.  
a) Spain is a beautiful country; the beache's are warm, sandy and spotlessly clean.
b) Spain is a beautiful country: the beaches are warm, sandy and spotlessly clean.
c) Spain is a beautiful country, the beaches are warm, sandy and spotlessly clean.
d) Spain is a beautiful country; the beaches are warm, sandy and spotlessly clean.

2.
a) The children's books were all left in the following places: Mrs Smith's room, Mr Powell's office and the caretaker's cupboard.
b) The children's books were all left in the following places; Mrs Smith's room, Mr Powell's office and the caretaker's cupboard.
c) The childrens books were all left in the following places: Mrs Smiths room, Mr Powells office and the caretakers cupboard.
d) The children's books were all left in the following places, Mrs Smith's room, Mr Powell's office and the caretaker's cupboard.

3.
a) She always enjoyed sweets, chocolate, marshmallows and toffee apples.
b) She always enjoyed: sweets, chocolate, marshmallows and toffee apples.
c) She always enjoyed sweets chocolate marshmallows and toffee apples.
d) She always enjoyed sweet's, chocolate, marshmallow's and toffee apple's.

4.
a) Sarah's uncle's car was found without its wheels in that old derelict warehouse.
b) Sarah's uncle's car was found without its wheels in that old, derelict warehouse.
c) Sarahs uncles car was found without its wheels in that old, derelict warehouse.
d) Sarah's uncle's car was found without it's wheels in that old, derelict warehouse.

5.
a) I can't see Tim's car, there must have been an accident.
b) I cant see Tim's car; there must have been an accident.
c) I can't see Tim's car there must have been an accident.
d) I can't see Tim's car; there must have been an accident.
  
(D)  Punctuate the following passage using appropriate punctuation marks whenever required:

winston is one of the most laid-back people i know he is tall and slim with black hair and he always wears a t-shirt and black jeans his jeans have holes in them and his baseball boots are scruffy too he usually sits at the back of the class and he often seems to be asleep however when the exam results are given out he always gets an "A" i don't think hes as lazy as he appears to be

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Functional English WORK SHEET 5.1

Functional English WORK SHEET 5.1
(A)  Punctuate the following sentences:

a. He is not really nice looking and yet he has enormous charm
b. That he was alone and wanted to be alone was a matter of concern of all
c. When I was a child I could watch TV whenever I wanted to
d. If you want to be healthy in life do this get up early work hard lead a natural life
e. It is a fine idea let us hope that it is going to work
f. When I heard a knock at the door I turned around
g. Mrs Solomon who was sitting behind the desk gave me a big smile
h. It is however not all that important to speak all the time
i. We were believe it or not in love with each other
j. When he was young Shakespeare who went on to become the greatest writer of all times married a woman eight years his senior
k. I don’t like this one bit said Julia
l. Have you met our handsome new financial director
m. If you are ever in London come and see you
n. Michael in the Ferrari was cornering superbly
o. Looking straight at her he said I cant help you

(B)   Find out basic punctuations errors:

a. God, the supreme creator and the supreme being is our only hope.
b. The industrial age saw a rise in the use of machinery.
c. There are twenty five applications for the job.
d. India must bring a right to work law.
e. Hell reply whenever we ask him.
f.  In this context, the word bond means a certificate indicating the loan money.
g. He said, “The implications of Mrs. Shah’s remarks that “benefits must be measured against costs” have not properly appreciated.”
h. The school closed on May 5, it will open on July 10.
i.  The job, however is beyond my reach. The aim therefore is to get proper education. The goal in my opinion is within my reach.
j.  The chairman, the secretary and the president have arrived.
k. Mr. Arora drafted the report and Mr. Nigam finalized it.
l.  Please answer the following questions: What is your age, height, weight?
m. Mr. Sinha is an I.P.S. officer working in I.B.M.
n. Will you please let me have the money today?
o. Mr. Shah asked when the appointment had been made?

(C)     Select the correctly punctuated sentence:
1.
a) Paul's neighbours were terrible; so his brother's friends went round to have a word.
b) Paul's neighbours were terrible: so his brother's friends went round to have a word.
c) Paul's neighbours were terrible, so his brother's friends went round to have a word.
d) Paul's neighbours were terrible so his brother's friends went round to have a word.

2.
a) Tims gran, a formidable woman, always bought him chocolate, cakes, sweets and a nice fresh apple.
b) Tim's gran a formidable woman always bought him chocolate, cakes, sweets and a nice fresh apple.
c) Tim's gran, a formidable woman, always bought him chocolate cakes sweets and a nice fresh apple.
d) Tim's gran, a formidable woman, always bought him chocolate, cakes, sweets and a nice fresh apple.

3.
a) After stealing Tims car, the thief lost his way and ended up the chief constable's garage.
b) After stealing Tim's car the thief lost his way and ended up the chief constable's garage.
c) After stealing Tim's car, the thief lost his way and ended up the chief constable's garage.
d) After stealing Tim's car, the thief lost his' way and ended up the chief constable's garage.

4.
a) We decided to visit: Spain, Greece, Portugal and Italy's mountains.
b) We decided to visit Spain, Greece, Portugal and Italys mountains.
c) We decided to visit Spain, Greece, Portugal and Italy's mountains.
d) We decided to visit Spain Greece Portugal and Italy's mountains.

5.
a) That tall man, Paul's grandad, is this month's winner.
b) That tall man Paul's grandad is this month's winner.
c) That tall man, Paul's grandad, is this months winner.
d) That tall man, Pauls grandad, is this month's winner.

(D)  Punctuate the following passage using appropriate punctuation marks whenever required:

running a massive enterprise is a tricky business being a woman and being at the helm of such an empire makes the situation all the more difficult to handle says apporva tendon the ceo of silkways designers, new delhi, and a premier fashion designer making men believe in womans calibre is the toughest thing in the world they can make errors and still can sound error free whereas even if an efficient woman errs just once she becomes fallen for ever says ms tandon one of the most talked about fashion designers of the last two decades in the country

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